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One Out Of 10 Child Asthma Cases Is Caused By Traffic Pollution

News by Krijana Duwal Published on 11 Apr,2019 Updated on 11 Apr,2019

A Global Study Suggested That Around Four Million Cases Of Childhood Asthma Could Be Caused By Air Pollution From Cars And Trucks Equivalent To 11,000 New Cases A Day.

  • Pediatric asthma is the biggest concern in today’s world.
  • Air pollution from cars and trucks could be the main reason behind developing asthma.
  • China and India are the countries with the highest number of asthma cases caused by traffic pollution.
  • Prof Susan Anenberg suggested that millions of new cases of pediatric asthma could be prevented by reducing air pollution.

There must be an immediate pollution guideline all over the world because most of the children developing asthma live in those areas within recommended levels.

The traffic pollution could be the reason for one in ten asthma children resulting in four million children developing asthma every year equivalent to 11,000 new cases every day.

Most of the news cases suggested that toxic air is even more harmful than thought.

CAPTION: Childhood asthma could be caused by air pollution SOURCE: kqed

The effect on children’s health is not only limited to India and China where the pollutions levels are extremely high. In the United Kingdom and in the Australian cities, researchers have blamed traffic pollution for around three-quarters of new childhood asthma cases.

As per researches, Canada holds the third highest rate of new traffic-related asthma cases among the 194 nations. Likewise, New York City and Los Angeles are the top ten worst cities out of 125 cities analyzed.

South Korea holds 31% of pollution-related childhood asthma cases from all over the world being followed by Kuwait 30%, Qatar 30%, United Arab Emirates 20%, and 26% Bahrain.

CAPTION: Childhood asthma could be caused by air pollution SOURCE: Medical Daily

Children are especially hampered by toxic air and exposure which leaves them with stunted lungs.

The research published in Lancet Planetary Health is the first global assessment of traffic smokes on childhood asthmas based on high-resolution pollution data.

The Prof Susan Anenberg from George Washington University in the United States suggested that millions of new cases of pediatric asthma could be prevented and controlled by reducing air pollution.

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